Rogaine Interactions: Should You Avoid Certain Drugs And Alcohol?

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Written by the UPGUYS Editorial Team Published on May 06, 2022

The golden years of a man's life should include a lot of things: retirement, kicking back with friends, weekly barbeques — and of course, a few ice-cold beers.

Let's face it. As great as the golden years are, they come with challenges like hair changes and erectile dysfunction. If you're thinning out on top, you're probably wondering what Rogaine interactions you could have when you drink those beers.

But that doesn't mean you can't still have a good time while you deal with those challenges. All you have to do is understand the possible Rogaine interactions with alcohol and drugs so you can fight hair loss with confidence.

In this article, we talk about the following:

  • What is Rogaine?
  • What drugs may interact with Rogaine?
  • Is there an interaction between Rogaine and alcohol?
  • What signs of warning should you be aware of?
  • Key takeaways 

What is Rogaine?

Rogaine is the brand name of a drug called minoxidil. Minoxidil is a vasodilator medication. This means it works by causing your blood vessels to dilate or widen, which is why it's also used for high blood pressure. 

Rogaine has a surprising history:

  • The FDA first approved minoxidil in 1979 as an antihypertensive medication
  • Later, researchers noticed that the mice they gave minoxidil to showed significant hair growth
  • Scientists still don't fully understand why minoxidil causes hair regrowth
  • However, dozens of studies show that it does work to restore hair
  • By the 1980s, doctors were prescribing the drug to patients who wanted to regrow their hair
  • Finally, in the late 1980s, Health Canada approved Rogaine for sale

Since then, Rogaine has been recommended for many types of hair loss. Men have reached for it for hair loss caused by age, stress and anxiety, and vitamin deficiency. There's even a women's version for hair loss after giving birth.

Minoxidil Topical vs Minoxidil Oral

Because of Rogaine's complex history, there are two versions of minoxidil:

  • Minoxidil oral (taken by mouth)
  • Minoxidil topical (applied to the scalp)

Minoxidil oral is still available as a blood pressure pill. You'll find it under the brand name Loniten. Because Loniten has significant effects on your body, it is only available by prescription. 

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Rogaine is the topical version of minoxidil. You can buy it without a prescription at most drugstores.

Because Loniten is an oral medication, it gets into your bloodstream. From there, it affects your whole body. It has far more side effects and drug interactions than Rogaine. 

Be careful: never take Loniten for hair regrowth. Although hair growth all over the body is a side effect of Loniten, it's only safe to take Rogaine for hair loss. 

Purchasing Rogaine

Rogaine is available in different strengths:

  • Rogaine 2%rogaine
  • Rogaine 5%

You can buy Rogaine as:

  • A liquid solution
  • Rogaine foam

Make sure you follow the application instructions for Rogaine. This minimizes side effects and keeps the drug from being absorbed into your system.

  • For men: apply Rogaine 2% or 5% once every 12 hours
  • For women: follow the same dosing schedule, but only use Rogaine 2% strength

Using minoxidil correctly is crucial to getting the results you want, so make sure you follow the package instructions.

What Drugs May Interact with Rogaine?

There are no known Rogaine drug interactions. Even though minoxidil is a potent antihypertensive drug, it has fewer effects when you apply it topically. 

Rogaine foam gets absorbed by your skin but shouldn't get into your bloodstream. That means it shouldn't interact with any drugs that you do take by mouth. 

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However, applying too much Rogaine can make your skin absorb it. From there, the minoxidil can get into your bloodstream and have systemic side effects. Be careful to apply a conservative amount of Rogaine so that it doesn't interact with any prescription drugs that you are taking.

Is There an Interaction Between Rogaine and Alcohol?

For the same reason, there are no severe Rogaine interactions with alcohol. 

However, that doesn't mean that you shouldn't be careful. Rogaine's side effects include:

  • Dizziness
  • Lightheadedness
  • Headache
  • Blurred vision

These side effects occur when you use too much Rogaine, and it gets absorbed into your bloodstream. If you're new to using Rogaine, it will take some trial and error to make sure you're not using too much product.

Rogaine doesn't directly interact with alcohol as many medications do. However, Rogaine and alcohol can cause similar side effects. When you combine them, you might find that you feel dizzier than you expected after a few drinks. 

The good news: you don't have to avoid alcohol altogether. However, take appropriate Rogaine precautions, especially when you're just beginning your treatment. 

Be cautious when you drink. Start with fewer drinks than you would normally have, then see how they affect you. You might find that you feel dizzier than you expected.

Key Takeaways

As men, we've all been there: wondering if you can take Viagra with alcohol, whether you should go for hair-regrowth shampoos or supplements, and how to enjoy the golden years and manage the effects of aging that accompany them.

Fortunately, here's one fewer question you have to worry about. If Rogaine food and drug interactions have been on your mind, stop worrying. Rogaine's interactions with alcohol and drugs are so minimal that you don't have to worry much about them.

Just make sure you take it easy when combining Rogaine with alcohol or sedative drugs. The combined side effects could affect you in unexpected ways. All you have to do is stay aware and know your limits.

Topical minoxidil doesn't have to break your bank. Source your minoxidil treatment from a quality supplier right here in Canada today.




Disclaimer
This article is written for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information provided in the articles cannot and should not replace advice from a healthcare professional. Talk to your healthcare provider about any physical or mental health concerns or the risks and benefits of any treatment or medication.